Acqua (Acqua Aria Terra), 1979/80, pastels on linen canvas, 200 x 150 cm
Aurorale, 1987 acrylic on canvas, 150 x 120 cm
Aurorale, 1987 acrylic on canvas, 150 x 120 cm
Senza titolo (bande colorate), 1973, acrylic on wood, 100 x 130 cm
Senza titolo (bande colorate), 1973, acrylic on wood, 120 x 80 cm
Senza titolo (bande colorate), 1973, acrylic on wood, 120 x 80 cm
Senza titolo (Beautiful lines), 1971 acrylic on canvas, 120 x 150 cm
Senza titolo (Spaghi - BLU), 1978, acrylic and cords on linen canvas, 200 x 150 cm
Rosanna Rossi Senza titolo, 1974 acrylic on canvas, 200h x 150w cm
Senza titolo, 1988-91, acrylic and oil on linen canvas, 150 x 150 cm
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Erre Erre

Rosanna Rossi

Prometeo Gallery Ida Pisani presents Erre Erre, the new exhibition by Rosanna Rossi (Cagliari, 1937).

Erre Erre

Rosanna Rossi

 

A woman, an artist: two identities that live together in her as if they were synonymous with each other. There is an indissoluble bond between her career and her life that reverberates in each of her works, taking charge of the presence of the viewer and giving back her artistic soul.

 

Erre Erre

Rigor Rhythm

 

Two constants that define an artistic research marked by continuous experimentation for more than sixty years. In Rosanna Rossi's world time is rhythm, marked by lines, lines and perfect brushstrokes of color, measured and calibrated, which stand out on the white canvas with control, caution, compositional rigor and spatial calibration. Series such as Bande Colorate, Beautiful Lines, Carati and Cartesiane seem to originate, like music, from knowledge. They are purely intellectual and then physical fact and in them, additionally to technical and linguistic refinement, there is a strong resonance of rigor in the distribution of rhythm.

 

Erre Erre

Review Rewind

 

What can one do that does not exist, whose shape, space, color, direction can be invented? This is the origin of the artistic research of Rosanna Rossi, who arrived at the non-figurative in the seventies, after a figuration of expressionist ancestry in the early seventies. It is not a question, however, of inventing at all, rather it is the concrete possibility that the practice of doing and seeing come together in a language in which traditional categories are reinvented in a new aesthetic definition. Spaghi, Garze, Guanti, Forme Sonate and Camouflage: these are some of the series that give back Rossi's ability of identification and metamorphosis but also that of evoking infinite variations in the spectator. And it is the variation that Rossi seeks, changing with a certain constancy the dimensions, directions, values and quantities. All this, in short, that a form can tell to those who look at it again and again and discover it again and again.